Hang in there little guy! Poor Little Fish created by Yan Lu, was designed to help remind people of their daily consumption. Since water consumption is extremely hard for us to calculate on a daily basis, Poor Little Fish basin offers an emotional way to persuade consumers to think about saving water, by making consumption tangible.


There is a traditional shaped fish bowl in the Poor Little Fish basin. While using, the level of water in the bowl gradually falls (but does not actually drain out); it will go back to the same level once the water stops running. As well, the water from the tap is pure, as its pipeline does not connect to the bowl.


(via)

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Looks like we’re not the only ones who appreciate a delicious cup of tea. Michelle Rabin, tea connoisseur and founder of T Ching, a blog dedicated to providing people with healthy and enjoyable lifestyle options, said: “My first glass of water was delicious, so I knew my tea would be more than happy swimming around in the pot.  And boy was I right.  I thought white tea, having the most subtle of flavor profiles, would be the best to assess the water quality and the harshest judge.  The results were as I had expected – all tea – no unpleasant flavor or taste that didn’t belong.”

Thanks Michelle! We’re delighted that MAVEA can be a part of helping you and your readers sustain a healthier lifestyle.

To read the full review, visit T Ching.

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Most Americans don’t think twice about their access to clean drinking water. Lets face it – we don’t have to. (Well, not yet at least) We take showers, brush our teeth, make pots of coffee and drink clean water flowing freely from our taps on a daily basis. But think about the 1 billion people in the world that do not have access to clean water. What do they do? Sadly, most women are forced into giving up their education to search for clean water for their family. And even when they may find it, poor sanitation can lead to diarrheal disease, one of the largest causes for child fatalities in the developing world. This video is a must-see for understanding the issue and putting the gravity of it into perspective. Watch below.

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Tap Water – What I like with this initiative is the simplicity of the design and the message it communicates – “People – I drink tap water”. Plain and simple. Buying any single-use item has a negative impact on our environment. With Tap Water, one bottle is enough.

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“I’ll take a glass of NYC’s finest tap water, hold the shrimp please.” Ugh, I can hear it now. Poor New York City and its notoriously delicious tap water has been all over the news lately. Hopefully the discovery of teeny, shrimp-like crustaceans called copepods found in their tap water supply hasn’t scared you into buying bottled water again.  For all you know, they could be in their too!

Although these micro-crustaceans aren’t extremely harmful, they still represent the notion that we don’t always know what’s lurking in our drinking water.  Using a water filtration system in your home is the best method to prevent this, while providing a piece of mind. I don’t know about you, but I like feeling confident that the water I’m drinking is not only a sustainable option, but clean and crustacean-free.

(via NY Mag & Gizmodo)

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(minus the water gluttony )

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I cringe every time I hear BPA. If there’s anything Inspired Water readers should know, it’s how dangerous of a substance this is.

The chemical BPA (Bishenol A) is used in hard plastics and tin cans. Most commonly found in plastic water bottles, soup cans, and baby bottles. Scientists have linked the organic compound to a host of problems. Scientific American recently said, “In recent years dozens of scientists around the globe have linked BPA to myriad health effects in rodents: mammary and prostate cancer, genital defects in males, early onset of puberty in females, obesity, and even behavior problems such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.”

But the ban on BPA is growing strong. Our neighbors to the north will be the first country to ban BPA entirely. Thank heavens for Canada officially declaring BPA a toxic substance! There’s no word on when the ban will take effect, but reportedly the North American chemical industry is furious with Environment Canada’s decision to abolish this nasty stuff. Let’s hope this puts pressure on the US to stand up against the chemical industry.

Until then, I recommend skipping the canned food aisle and single-use water bottles. Instead, buy fresh produce from local farmers’ markets and purchase a reusable stainless steel water bottle and refill it with tap water filtered through a BPA-Free water pitcher.

(via Grist)

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