What will our water situation look like in 2050? Visualeconomics did a beautiful job illustrating select statistics about our world’s water crisis.

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I don’t know about you, but I have a hard time getting out of the shower in the morning. I think it’s the combination of not enough sleep, warm water, and no caffeine. It’s not until my first cup of joe that I actually start picking up the pace. If you can relate, I think this Water Pebble is diffidently worth checking out!

Product designer Paul Priestman collaborated with Dry Planet to launch this award-winning product. The Water Pebble is a revolutionary water saving device, designed to reduce the amount of water you use by making you aware of your actions.

Here’s details from their website on how this little water saver works “The clever device monitors water going down the plug hole when you shower.  Memorising your first shower and using it as a benchmark, Waterpebble then indicates, via a series of ‘traffic lights’ flashing gently from green through to red, when to finish showering.  Each time you shower Waterpebble automatically fractionally reduces your shower time helping you to save water without needing to think about it.”

What a smart idea for making your water saving habits a bit more instinctive!

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Katie Spotz, spent 70 days, 5 hours, and 22 minutes aboard her 17 ft boat, rowing across the Atlantic Ocean. At the young age of 22, she has made history as the youngest person to row an ocean solo, and is the first ever American to row from Africa to South America. Katie’s journey started west of Africa and ended on the shores of Georgetown, Guyana, totaling 2,817 nautical miles. Extreme athletic challenges are nothing new for this seasoned pro. Katie has succeeded many challenges such as, swimming the entire length of the Allegheny River, biking across the entire U.S., and running across the Mojave and Colorado desert.

Challenging her endurance, and breaking world records were only part of the drive behind Katie’s adventure. There was something more important behind her mission – safe drink water. Katie partnered with Blue Planet Run Foundation to help raise funds for sustainable safe drinking water projects around the world.

“My goal is to raise enough funds to help, at the very least, 1,000 people gain access to safe drinking water. So no matter what your budget, your contribution can make a big difference. In fact, for just $30 you can provide one person access to safe drinking water for life!”

Read Katie’s pre-journey interview and view pictures from her trip after the jump!

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Dear Tea/Beatles fans,

Today is your day to rejoice! I’ve found the perfect product for all you Yellow Submarine singing, tea defusing fanatics out there. This little yellow sub tea diffuser turns any drab cup of tea into a charming spot of fun. Simply place loose tea leaves (which is greener than buying individual tea bags and compost friendly ) into the chamber, close the lid, and watch the tea being steeped as it submerges to the bottom of your cup. This is a morning must have! You can buy one here.

(via GreenHead)

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Plastiki – kinda sounds like one of those fruity drinks they serve pool side in the Caribbean, topped with a pineapple cherry flag and an umbrella. Take one part adventurer, one part environmentalist, 12,500 parts reclaimed plastic bottles, add a splash of ocean water, shake vigorously and viola – one Plastiki coming up! Not exactly a vacationer’s libation of choice. Although, David Mayer de Rothschild isn’t planning a vacation, he’s planning a voyage across the Pacific Ocean on a boat made of reclaimed plastic bottles.

Stay tuned for more about Plastiki’s journey and video after the jump.

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Germany’s Muthesius Academy of Fine Arts student, Imke Hoehler turned heads with her Industrial Design thesis project that encompassed finding a solution to our global water shortage. “Drinking Water Abstraction World Wide” was her idea around developing a DropNet fog collector. Simply put, the collector extracts tiny water droplets from fog clouds and turns them into drinking water. “Dependent on the conditions, DropNet can collect, 10 – 20 liter water per m^2 a day.”

The DropNet’s versatile construction allows for it to be placed on flat or uneven ground. It can even be placed on the hilliest of hills. Check out the picture below!

The ideal locations for fog collectors are in arid, costal areas with altitudes between 400 and 1200 m, that harvest a high accumulation of fog. Chile, Peru, Haiti, South Africa, Eritrea, Nepal, Spain and Portugal are all prime candidates for adopting fog collection. You can check out more detailed pictures of DropNet on Hoehler’s porfolio.

(via Inhabitat)

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Watercrunch revealed the shocking truth about “How Much Water is Consumed for a Google Search”. I’ve posted the article below. Crazy to think about!

It is not their fault. They only give you less than a half a second to think about what just happened.

Maybe if you could hear the digital chirps, like when you mistakenly dial a fax line, this would remind you what is going on behind the scenes after you clicked that Google search button.

First you would hear a short chirp of the web server sending your search to an index server and then another server would chime in saying it is retrieving the snippets of stored documents for each search. Google has previously reported that .0003 kwH is used for each search.

So, how much water is used per search?

I calculated this for a presentation I did a few months ago to illustrate the water energy nexus. Assuming a typical thermoelectric plant provides the energy (400 gallons/mwH evaporated or consumed), a Google search would evaporate or consume 1/10 of a teaspoon of water.  This does not sound like a lot until you think how many Google searches there are per day.

Hint. There are over 293 million google searches a day.  I’ll leave this math with someone else.

(via Watercrunch)

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